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Celebrating the Wilderness Act of 1964

April 1st, 2014

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Yesterday marked the 50th anniversary of the 1964 Wilderness Act.  I was happy to accompany many individuals at the Capitol to celebrate the beauty of Colorado’s wilderness.  Representative Hamner and I welcomed John Fielder, a renowned Colorado nature photographer, and David Mason, Colorado Poet Laureate.  Both John’s and David’s work captures the glory and vitality of Colorado’s wilderness area and their contributions help preserve nature for generations to come.

In my district alone, there are several wilderness areas protected under the 1964 act: Gunnison Gorge, Uncompahgre, Weminuche, West Elks, Maroon Bells, Collegiate Peak, and Raggeds.  Below is a tribute to the Wilderness Act of 1964 as presented at the event on Monday.

We acknowledge and celebrate the National Wilderness Preservation System, and the positive impact that it has had on Colorado. The bipartisan Wilderness Act of 1964 established the National Wilderness Preservation System and through the act, along with subsequent additions, we have protected 3.6 million acres of Colorado’s most magnificent public lands. In Colorado, some of our most iconic places protected as wilderness, including: the Maroon Bells, Dominguez Canyon, the Flat Tops, the Collegiate Peaks, the Great Sand Dunes, much of Rocky Mountain National Park, and the Indian Peaks are some shining examples of the diverse lands and ecosystems in our state. The National Wilderness Preservation System protects and sustains habitats and watersheds while supporting Colorado’s vibrant outdoor recreation economy which generates over $13 billion in direct spending annually. Protected lands are widely supported by the citizens of Colorado.  Let us honor the uniquely American qualities of the National Wilderness Preservation System’s accomplishment, a remarkable societal compact whereby the American people elevated stewardship. In this golden anniversary year of 2014, we invite all Americans to visit and enjoy Colorado’s wilderness areas, to learn about their history, and to aid in their continuing protection and stewardship.

Celebrating the Wilderness Act of 1964

Yesterday marked the 50th anniversary of the 1964 Wilderness Act.  I was happy to accompany many individuals at the Capitol to celebrate the beauty of Colorado’s wilderness.  Representative Hamner and I welcomed John Fielder, a renowned Colorado nature photographer, and David Mason, Colorado Poet Laureate.  Both John’s and David’s work captures the glory and vitality of Colorado’s wilderness area and their contributions help preserve nature for generations to come.

In my district alone, there are several wilderness areas protected under the 1964 act: Gunnison Gorge, Uncompahgre, Weminuche, West Elks, Maroon Bells, Collegiate Peak, and Raggeds.  Below is a tribute to the Wilderness Act of 1964 as presented at the event on Monday.

We acknowledge and celebrate the National Wilderness Preservation System, and the positive impact that it has had on Colorado. The bipartisan Wilderness Act of 1964 established the National Wilderness Preservation System and through the act, along with subsequent additions, we have protected 3.6 million acres of Colorado’s most magnificent public lands. In Colorado, some of our most iconic places protected as wilderness, including: the Maroon Bells, Dominguez Canyon, the Flat Tops, the Collegiate Peaks, the Great Sand Dunes, much of Rocky Mountain National Park, and the Indian Peaks are some shining examples of the diverse lands and ecosystems in our state. The National Wilderness Preservation System protects and sustains habitats and watersheds while supporting Colorado’s vibrant outdoor recreation economy which generates over $13 billion in direct spending annually. Protected lands are widely supported by the citizens of Colorado.  Let us honor the uniquely American qualities of the National Wilderness Preservation System’s accomplishment, a remarkable societal compact whereby the American people elevated stewardship. In this golden anniversary year of 2014, we invite all Americans to visit and enjoy Colorado’s wilderness areas, to learn about their history, and to aid in their continuing protection and stewardship.